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HaaT Craftsmanship - Japan

HeaRT

Since its creation in 2000, HaaT has continued to focus on “Made in Japan,” developing Japanese techniques hand-in-hand with local manufacturers, and putting them to use in new and interesting items of clothing for today. These textiles were born by adding a brand-original perspective to Japanese materials, and superimposing ingenuity to bring about comfort and lightness.

CHAMEN ORGANIC

CHAMEN ORGANIC

Organically farmed cotton is naturally brown, resurrecting for modern times the original brown hues that used to be the color of cotton in ancient times. Organic cotton is often used, but brown cotton is said to be representative of ecological natural materials. Natural brown cotton generally has a harder texture and has an unrefined image, a presence that is often seen as distant from fashion. However, the brown cotton was cultivated in Dr. Fox’s farm for three years without any chemicals. The seeds are not genetically modified. It has a deeper natural brown hue with a pliable texture that overturns the conventional image. The material itself is natural. Because organic cotton is expensive, fabric using organic cotton usually uses thread that is loosely twisted with an emphasis on texture, but we put emphasis on durability and finish the fabric with a high thread count that gives the fabric a crisp texture. Additionally, tuft patterns using cut cotton thread have been incorporated to give the garment a three-dimensional finish.

HORIZONTAL LINE

HORIZONTAL LINE

The cool, refreshing striped lines of the soft fabric have a translucence due to the use of silk thread for the warp and cotton thread for the weft. By using unevenly dyed thread for the weft, the pattern looks as though it has been scratched. There are many weavers in the Niigata Prefecture of Japan, and since the company began, we have utilized numerous cotton yarn-dyed fabrics from this region. Hataya weavers have maintained the dyeing traditions and have individual sample books of scraps that we call Shimacho. Mitsuke, Tochio, and Kameda are production areas that produce natural materials, such as sturdy cotton and silk fabrics that are closely connected to the lives of the Japanese. The crepe fabric that has a textured surface is also perfectly suited for highly humid Japanese summers. Lines and lattices are the origins of the patterns and the weavers in Tochio are particularly skillful and passionate about the development of these patterns. They use thin silk filaments that other weavers struggle to handle to weave luxurious and lightweight fabric with mixed cotton and silk.

KUMO SHIBORI

KUMO SHIBORI

Artisans skilled in Arimatsu tie-dyeing techniques use machines to weave the expanding and contracting needle in and out of the fabric. The hand-winding thread on the spool is used to tie the fabric and process it to make the dye. The shape-memory characteristic of polyester allows the bumps of the tied portions to be incorporated into the design. The tie-dye spider web pattern is the most common Arimatsu tie-dyeing pattern. Arimatsu has flourished since mameshibori (dot pattern) tenugui towels were first sold at the time of the Battle of Okehazama in 16th century Japan. Over time and with repeated improvements, it has developed further. These traditional methods have been passed down using tools and techniques to mass-produce various tie-dye patterns. The tie-dyed patterns are commonplace, but in the tied parts it creates beautiful organic form. As a classic feature for twenty years, we have continued to use these small machine-made spider web bumps as icons to decorate the neck area and hems.

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