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HaaT Craftsmanship - India

HaaTH

HaaTH, which lets one feel the warmth of the hand, relays Indian craftsmanship to the modern world. Craftsmen of the highest level belong to the studio located in the northwestern city of Ahmedabad, and the things created there are so precise, that it is hard to believe they are handcrafted. It is hoped that the knowledge passed down from one hand to another can also be used in contemporary designs created in Tokyo. HaaT captures the culture and tradition deeply imbedded in this land and continues collaborating in making clothes.

BORIA / DORI

BORIA / DORI

In order to eliminate waste as much as possible, the buttons and cords used at HaaTH are made by hand using leftover fabric from clothing. This is an artisan technique to make buttons from fabric alone with no core. When we discovered these cute, round buttons, we weren’t aware that they were made from a single piece of cloth. A circle is drawn with running stitches in the center of a square and when it is closed, the remaining cloth of the square is pushed inside. This creates a Boria, which is a round button with a core made from cotton. We were moved by the creation of these buttons, which doesn’t waste leftover cloth—the ultimate eco-button. Similarly, cord is created by folding a single long rectangular piece of cloth into half and sewing it in the vertical direction. The thread is pushed in from the ends and when it is turned inside out, it creates Dori, a thin cord that uses the fabric on the outside of the stitching as a core. These buttons and cords are wasteless and have no color gradation, becoming one with the clothing.

KHADI

KHADI

Khadi is a woven cotton fabric that is symbolic in India. Using a spinning wheel called a charkha, the thread is spun from cotton one thread at a time. It is woven to create a cotton fabric that conveys the warmth unique to hand-woven work. The first encounter with KHADI, a simple material, took place at a material conference between ISSEY MIYAKE and India in France. Development subsequently moved forward and the redevelopment of the legendary Dacca muslin, which was developed as the ultimate luxury cloth fit for emperors to battle the heat of the Subcontinent, resulted in an extremely fine and sheer fabric. How can this feather-light and fine thread be spun by hand? When we arrived at the village after a six-hour ride from Calcutta, the fabric was being woven by hand in silence in the heat, with the loom half-buried in the ground to prevent the thread from breaking. Outside, we were astounded by the sight of artisans warping the thread with glue in their mouths to stabilize and reinforce it. Although Martand Singh, the developer of SUPER FINE KHADI, has passed away, this fabric remains ecological and sheer natural fabric.

BHILL

BHILL

The delicate Bhill embroidery is machine-stitched by skilled Indian artisans. Embroidery is part of Indian wisdom about recycling, as it results in the creation of clothing that can be worn for longer, looking more beautiful, while making frays in the fabric less noticeable. With delicate hand movements and practiced skills, the artisans handle the sewing machines masterfully and freely as if using a pencil or pen to follow a sketch, to create patterns while adeptly adjusting the machines with their hands and feet. Embroidering the fabric reinforces it and makes it sturdier, making it ideal for outerwear and bags. Artisans can take up the challenge of creating new patterns each time and each piece ends up differently depending on the artisan’s personality. The hand-made patterns are delicate, light, and rustic. The one-stroke machine stitched Bhill is a product of the taste and sensibilities of the skilled artisans.

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