EN

Special Re-edition Model:
IM-101

STORY

About “IM-101”
IM-101 was a pair of sunglasses released in 1985. At the time its simple design of a line and two circles—a clear, understated graphic form—was considered one of the most recognized models of ISSEY MIYAKE eyewear. More than 30 years have passed and still IM-101 continues to convey a presence that is bold and strong.



The Birth of Special Re-edition Model: IM-101
It was spring 2017 when ISSEY MIYAKE EYES PROJECT set out to bring back the design of IM-101 and started the re-edition project. Despite limited reference of the original’s specifications, the team attempted to produce the re-edition model that stays true to the original. Through trial-and-error, titanium was chosen as the material as the team adapted the model for contemporary use. And as a result a lightweight, flexible, and durable model is born—the special re-edition model: IM-101.


Photography as the Starting Point
The original IM-101 was featured in many photographs. Among them, New York-based photographer Henry Leutwyler in his book DOCUMENT photographed the pair of IM-101 owned by Jean-Michel Basquiat, the young American artist of the 1980’s who appeared on the New York art scene and soon passed away (photo titled, “Jean-Michel Basquiat’s Issey Miyake sunglasses”). In spring 2017, the photograph was exhibited at gallery The Mass in Harajuku, Tokyo, where designer Yusuke Takahashi first saw the original IM-101 through the medium of photography. Looking at the photo, what he sensed was not anything nostalgic but rather the strength of creativity adaptable for contemporary design and the future. And this is what inspired him to embark on the re-edition project.

PHOTOGRAPHY

In the photograph “Jean-Michel Basquiat’s Issey Miyake sunglasses” one can clearly see the artist’s worn marks: the missing nose pad, the scratches on the metal frame, and the discoloration on the temple tip. The photograph seems to convey the humanity and warmth left behind by Basquiat in the glasses. And through Leutwyler’s lens the creative energy of the time that Basquiat once lived becomes apparent. As a photographer who delivers work with a riveting aesthetic, Leutwyler participated in the project and photographed the re-edition model. Therefore like this two pairs of IM-101, one original and the other re-edition, 30 years apart, have been captured in Leutwyler’s frames.
Henry Leutwyler
Henry Leutwyler ©Sharon Suh

Henry Leutwyler

Born in Switzerland in 1961, Leutwyler is a self-taught photographer with a stubborn streak and unflappable love for the medium. He decided not to follow his grandfather and father’s path as printers, and instead to travel and photograph, soaking up color and culture from around the world. In 1985, Leutwyler moved to Paris where he apprenticed with photographer Gilles Tapie and rapidly established himself as an editorial photographer. A decade later, Leutwyler moved to New York City.

Today, Leutwyler’s celebrity portraits can be found in the pages of Vogue, Vanity Fair, the New York Times Magazine, The New Yorker, Esquire Magazine and Time. Since 2010, three books have been published with Steidl: Neverland Lost: A Portrait of Michael Jackson, Ballet: Photographs of the New York City Ballet, and his latest project DOCUMENT. His work has been shown in solo shows in Los Angeles, New York, Madrid, Moscow, Zurich, and Tokyo. In 2017, The Fine Arts Museum in Le Locle offered him a 4-month solo show on his work published in DOCUMENT.

Often spare and unflinchingly tight, Leutwyler’s photographs are a quiet yet striking rebuttal to today’s hyper retouched and uber stylized images, revealing something from the subjects that isn’t obvious—finding the beauty within.

http://www.henryleutwyler.com/
『DOCUMENT』
DOCUMENT

DOCUMENT

This book is a collection of belongings of famous people in history such as James Dean’s wallet, Audrey Hepburn’s typewriter, Muhammad Ali’s boxing shoes, Elvis Presley’s handgun, Michael Jackson’s gloves, etc. Having already established himself as a celebrity portrait photographer, in DOCUMENT Leutwyler attempted to photograph portraits of objects with their owners absent.

PRODUCT

  • IM-101_black
  • IM-101_brushsilver

Special Re-edition Model:IM-101

IM-101_black IM-101_black IM-101_brushsilver IM-101_brushsilver

Special Re-edition Model:IM-101

IM-101_brushsilver IM-101_brushsilver IM-101_black IM-101_black